David A. Snyder

89 Texas L. Rev. 1019

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According to democratic theory, copyright should be used to bring society, individuals, or both closer to some ideal.  Democratic theorists thus value the active making of works of expression by individuals, that is, participation, because they believe it can help to achieve this ideal.

In this Note, Snyder explores two problems with the value of participation.  First, the content of the value of participation is vague, with room for greater specification.  Second, the value of participation seemingly violates the neutrality thesis by mandating government action on the basis of a conception of the good. Neutralists, by contrast, argue that coercive government action designed to promote a view of the good is inappropriate.

Snyder argues that understanding the relationship between the value of autonomy and that of participation helps to give further specification of the latter.  Moreover, Snyder argues that this modified concept of participation does not violate the neutrality thesis.  On the one hand, it does not qualify as a concept of the good.  On the other, its implementation does not involve coercion.