Category Archives: SA Vol. 95

Potential Life In The Doctrine

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Professor Litman responds to Profesors Chemerinsky and Goodwin’s recent article and argues that while the threat to abortion rights is real, it is not just from the undue burden standard: it is from politicians who, with the help of lawyers, will continue to try and legislate abortion out of existence and drain the legal standards governing abortion of any meaning.

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Filling the Texas Federal Court Vacancies

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In this essay, Professor Tobias surveys the history of modern appointments complications and the Texas judicial vacancy crisis. Professor Tobias argues that expanding caseloads, increasing appellate and district court judgeships, and rampant partisanship have clearly undermined selection efforts across the country and Texas, which is ground zero for the “confirmation wars.”

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Understanding Immigrant Protective Policies in Criminal Justice

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Professor Jain responds to Professor Eagly’s recent article by situating Professor Eagly’s discussion of “immigrant protective policies” in the context of recent federal efforts to regulate “sanctuary” jurisdictions. Professor Jain argues for the need to unpack the motivations that guide law enforcement officials in responding to collateral consequences. The response also considers the implications of Eagly’s analysis in light of a broader blurring of the boundaries of civil and criminal law.

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Rethinking the Choice of “Private Choice” in Conceptualizing Abortion: A Response to Erwin Chemerinsky and Michele Goodwin’s Abortion: A Woman’s Private Choice

By | SA Vol. 95, Uncategorized | No Comments
Professors Rimalt and Yefet respond to Dean Chemerinsky and Professor Goodwin’s recent article by arguing for a supplementary equality framing that defines the scope and substance of the right to abortion on the basis of equal treatment standards and measures the female right against other comparable male rights.

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Young Adults Are Different, Too: Why and How We Can Create a Better Justice System for Young People Age 18 to 25

By | SA Vol. 95 | No Comments
In this note, Stamm argues for folding young adults into the juvenile justice system by reviewing the various ways in which many states have already taken the lessons of the juvenile system—lots of treatment and programming, age-limited facilities, shorter sentences, and sealed records—and applied them to the developmentally similar young adult population.

PDF

Category Archives: SA Vol. 95

Potential Life In The Doctrine

By | SA Vol. 95 | No Comments
Professor Litman responds to Profesors Chemerinsky and Goodwin’s recent article and argues that while the threat to abortion rights is real, it is not just from the undue burden standard: it is from politicians who, with the help of lawyers, will continue to try and legislate abortion out of existence and drain the legal standards governing abortion of any meaning.

PDF

Filling the Texas Federal Court Vacancies

By | SA Vol. 95 | No Comments
In this essay, Professor Tobias surveys the history of modern appointments complications and the Texas judicial vacancy crisis. Professor Tobias argues that expanding caseloads, increasing appellate and district court judgeships, and rampant partisanship have clearly undermined selection efforts across the country and Texas, which is ground zero for the “confirmation wars.”

PDF

Understanding Immigrant Protective Policies in Criminal Justice

By | SA Vol. 95 | No Comments
Professor Jain responds to Professor Eagly’s recent article by situating Professor Eagly’s discussion of “immigrant protective policies” in the context of recent federal efforts to regulate “sanctuary” jurisdictions. Professor Jain argues for the need to unpack the motivations that guide law enforcement officials in responding to collateral consequences. The response also considers the implications of Eagly’s analysis in light of a broader blurring of the boundaries of civil and criminal law.

PDF

Rethinking the Choice of “Private Choice” in Conceptualizing Abortion: A Response to Erwin Chemerinsky and Michele Goodwin’s Abortion: A Woman’s Private Choice

By | SA Vol. 95, Uncategorized | No Comments
Professors Rimalt and Yefet respond to Dean Chemerinsky and Professor Goodwin’s recent article by arguing for a supplementary equality framing that defines the scope and substance of the right to abortion on the basis of equal treatment standards and measures the female right against other comparable male rights.

PDF

Young Adults Are Different, Too: Why and How We Can Create a Better Justice System for Young People Age 18 to 25

By | SA Vol. 95 | No Comments
In this note, Stamm argues for folding young adults into the juvenile justice system by reviewing the various ways in which many states have already taken the lessons of the juvenile system—lots of treatment and programming, age-limited facilities, shorter sentences, and sealed records—and applied them to the developmentally similar young adult population.

PDF